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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

TALES FROM THE GHETTO: BUSINESS AS USUAL

HushI must have been in a trance the other night, because I saw my dad walk into the living room and asking me to go inside and take off my wet clothes. Even if I had tried, words would not come out of my mouth; not even “Good evening sir”. At first I hesitated, in anticipation that it was a decoy, but on a second thought, I’d rather die by father’s whips, than let the harsh cold kill me.


My teeth chattered loudly in the room, I thought my mom would wake up. As I stood at the door, contemplating whether to go back to the parlor or not, my dad walked into the room and said, “I think your food is in the cupboard”. I still didn’t say a word. I walked out to the parlor with my mat and wrapper that served as my duvet. Somehow, I slept very well that night. It felt like sleeping in a dream.


The next day was Saturday (environmental sanitation). Nobody woke me up to join the rest of the compound for sanitation. It felt strange, because I only got such treatment when I’m ill. I could perceive the scent of stew coming from the room. I decided to check the room to see if my mom was inside, and yes… she was serving rice and stew for breakfast. She looked up, and called me by my native name, “Nduka, Nduka, Nduka… mbgorole kam’ kporo gi?


“Three times, ma”, I replied.


She stretched a plate of rice to me, and said, “Fly wey no dey hear word, dey follow dead body enter grave. Even the Bible says, a word is enough for the wise”


I was actually hungry and my mom’s speech was not new to me. It’s actually the same thing she says when she considers my behavior as extreme. I ate with the fear that my dad could walk in and punch the spoon into my throat. My taste buds instantly became numb. Each sound, of footsteps in the corridor increased my fear. I could be in danger with my dad. For my mom to sound like this, it could mean she and my dad had discussed my ‘fuck-up’ and my dad might have an actual plan.


I couldn’t even finish my food. I heard my younger brother asking if I was full, so he can have the rest of my food, but I couldn’t care less. I ignored him. The plate almost slipped out of my hand, when I was trying to drop it on the cupboard. I heard my dad’s voice chatting and laughing with a neighbor on the corridor. I didn’t know if I should stay in the room or go to the parlor. Before I could make up my mind, my dad had entered the house. “Where is Innocent?” He asked, and something inside of me answered on my behalf, “I dey inside room; I dey drink water”. He just said “Ok”, and that was it. I probably would have remained in the room, if I had not heard my dad say he was coming into the room to change and go have a bath.


Reading my school books was easier when I’m in trouble. Before my dad walked into the room, I had rushed to my bag to take a couple of notebooks. My dad didn’t even look at me, as I walked past him to the parlor. I sat quietly on the floor and buried my head in one of the notes, thinking of what my dad could be up to. Why is he acting like it is ‘business as usual’?


In no time, my dad was ready to leave the house. “Daddy bye-bye”, my brother waved excitedly, as the door closed after my dad. I wasn’t bold enough to say goodbye, but I was happy he was going out.


It didn’t take too long before Nuru came knocking on our door. “How far na? I just see your papa enter okada dey comotNa him, I say make I come check on my guy”. If Nuru had stopped there, it probably won’t be a problem, but the fool continued, “Omo, Michael get fat koko for him right eye, him papa nearly kill am. The idiot ignored all my efforts to communicate with my eyes and hands.


My mom was in the room and I’m sure she could hear Nuru and his big mouth. I was confused, but I knew I needed to stop him before he mentions anything about the hotel. He was going to open his mouth again, when I shouted, “I reject you this demon; arise now and leave my house… you worker of iniquity!” Before Nuru could absorb what I had just said, I topped it up, “Mommy, come tell this boy to get outside, before I blow him eye oh”Nuru got the message eventually, as he gaped in surprise and sneaked out.


I was wondering why my mom did not come out after my loud protest, so I stylishly walked towards the room to listen through the door, but there was no sign of movement. I decided to go into the room and interestingly, my mom wasn’t there. She had gone out through the back door to probably go have a bath. This discovery was so funny to me. I laughed really loud at myself and my stupid friend. I couldn’t wait to see him later to share the gist.


My mom left a few instructions about warming the soup for lunch and changing the newspapers in the cupboard before leaving for the market. I was finally free to go outside and personally see what has become of everybody, including Ebi that we did not see during the Police raid at the hotel.




To be continued…





TALES FROM THE GHETTO: BUSINESS AS USUAL

TALES FROM THE GHETTO: BUSINESS AS USUAL


I must have been in a trance the other night, because I saw my dad walk into the living room and asking me to go inside and take off my wet clothes. Even if I had tried, words would not come out of my mouth; not even “Good evening sir”. At first I hesitated, in anticipation that it was a decoy, but on a second thought, I’d rather die by father’s whips, than let the harsh cold kill me.

My teeth chattered loudly in the room, I thought my mom would wake up. As I stood at the door, contemplating whether to go back to the parlor or not, my dad walked into the room and said, “I think your food is in the cupboard”. I still didn’t say a word. I walked out to the parlor with my mat and wrapper that served as my duvet. Somehow, I slept very well that night. It felt like sleeping in a dream.

The next day was Saturday (environmental sanitation). Nobody woke me up to join the rest of the compound for sanitation. It felt strange, because I only got such treatment when I’m ill. I could perceive the scent of stew coming from the room. I decided to check the room to see if my mom was inside, and yes… she was serving rice and stew for breakfast. She looked up, and called me by my native name, “Nduka, Nduka, Nduka… mbgorole kamkporo gi?

“Three times, ma”, I replied.

She stretched a plate of rice to me, and said, “Fly wey no dey hear word, dey follow dead body enter grave. Even the Bible says, a word is enough for the wise”

I was actually hungry and my mom’s speech was not new to me. It’s actually the same thing she says when she considers my behavior as extreme. I ate with the fear that my dad could walk in and punch the spoon into my throat. My taste buds instantly became numb. Each sound, of footsteps in the corridor increased my fear. I could be in danger with my dad. For my mom to sound like this, it could mean she and my dad had discussed my ‘fuck-up’ and my dad might have an actual plan.

I couldn’t even finish my food. I heard my younger brother asking if I was full, so he can have the rest of my food, but I couldn’t care less. I ignored him. The plate almost slipped out of my hand, when I was trying to drop it on the cupboard. I heard my dad’s voice chatting and laughing with a neighbor on the corridor. I didn’t know if I should stay in the room or go to the parlor. Before I could make up my mind, my dad had entered the house. “Where is Innocent?” He asked, and something inside of me answered on my behalf, “I dey inside room; I dey drink water”. He just said “Ok”, and that was it. I probably would have remained in the room, if I had not heard my dad say he was coming into the room to change and go have a bath.

Reading my school books was easier when I’m in trouble. Before my dad walked into the room, I had rushed to my bag to take a couple of notebooks. My dad didn’t even look at me, as I walked past him to the parlor. I sat quietly on the floor and buried my head in one of the notes, thinking of what my dad could be up to. Why is he acting like it is ‘business as usual’?

In no time, my dad was ready to leave the house. “Daddy bye-bye”, my brother waved excitedly, as the door closed after my dad. I wasn’t bold enough to say goodbye, but I was happy he was going out.

It didn’t take too long before Nuru came knocking on our door. “How far na? I just see your papa enter okada dey comot. Na him, I say make I come check on my guy”. If Nuru had stopped there, it probably won’t be a problem, but the fool continued, “Omo, Michael get fat koko for him right eye, him papa nearly kill am. The idiot ignored all my efforts to communicate with my eyes and hands.

My mom was in the room and I’m sure she could hear Nuru and his big mouth. I was confused, but I knew I needed to stop him before he mentions anything about the hotel. He was going to open his mouth again, when I shouted, “I reject you this demon; arise now and leave my house… you worker of iniquity!” Before Nuru could absorb what I had just said, I topped it up, “Mommy, come tell this boy to get outside, before I blow him eye oh”. Nuru got the message eventually, as he gaped in surprise and sneaked out.

I was wondering why my mom did not come out after my loud protest, so I stylishly walked towards the room to listen through the door, but there was no sign of movement. I decided to go into the room and interestingly, my mom wasn’t there. She had gone out through the back door to probably go have a bath. This discovery was so funny to me. I laughed really loud at myself and my stupid friend. I couldn’t wait to see him later to share the gist.

My mom left a few instructions about warming the soup for lunch and changing the newspapers in the cupboard before leaving for the market. I was finally free to go outside and personally see what has become of everybody, including Ebi that we did not see during the Police raid at the hotel.


To be continued...

Monday, April 14, 2014

"EDUCATION IS NOT FOR ME" - TIMAYA

Timaya was probably the dullest student in his school days,  but the Egberi Papa 1 of Bayelsa still makes an effort to inspire youths across the country with his enormous success in the music industry and his ‘grass to grace’ story.

Timaya made sure to share a story during his eclectic performance at the third leg of Star Music Trek, which held in Uyo on April 12, 2014.
 
“Education is not for me,” the hit artiste confessed, “It is important, yes, but not for me for me”

“I scored 17 in JAMB, That's when I gave up. I don’t have the brain for education but for those of you who do, please go for it, it is good.” He further stressed.

No one can dispute that the Niger Delta star is still passionate about education -or at least, strongly encourages others to have it.

It’s thrilling to note too that despite his 'limitation’, he has risen to become one of the most influential artistes in the country today who, consistently intersperses his performances with an enduring message to young people, advising them to always harness their talent and exploit it.

 

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

WATCH RISE OF THE QUEEN: VICTORIA KIMANI

Victoria Kimani
Chocolate City Music in collaboration with Reel E TV presents THE RISE OF THE QUEEN - a reality web series covering Victoria Kimani behind the scenes, over the last couple of months. 


"M.M.B.M.T.Y IS A SONG FOR THE STREET" - CYRUS DA VIRUS.


If you've followed Cyrus' music from the start, you'll be conversant with his grimy and fierce delivery on any beat. The energy he bestows on his music is matchless. It's like forcing the gospel on you, if you don't believe, that is. His vibe infects you like a 'Virus'... He has also been addressed on several occasions, the forerunner of the South-South. 

Here we have a new joint by 'Da Virus' himself - "M.M.B.M.T.Y", an acronym for 'Money Must Be Made This Year'. After dropping 'The Infiltration Mixtape' to critical acclaim, the South-South brand kicks off the new year with this stupefying street anthem which is also tagged - "EGBE" (a Benin city street slang for 'Problem'). 

In his words, "The rap scene is changing rapidly; if you are not communicating with the people in their own language, they will leave you. So, "M.M.B.M.T.Y" (Egbe) is surely for the street and I believe they can relate to it."

The avowed South-South Field Marshal, is heard heard spitting flames on this trap beat by American producer Dj Fatality. Also invited to the murk-fest, is new Arrow Gang member Cha Cha, a songstress that is sure to hold her own soon. 

"M.M.B.M.T.Y" is the first single, off Cyrus' next EP, titled, 'VIROLOGY'.

Listen and download HERE
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